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The new RODEO weblock is here

6/13/2019 2:56 PM

raed slacklines RODEO weblock for rodeolines

The next generation RODEO weblock is finally here! We received lots of feedback on our first version, so we collected all that feedback and improved the known version in many little details:

* smoother pretensioning

* ball lock pin for simpler handling

* higher webbing guidance for better alignment during huge surfs

* increased space at the back for easier webbing handling

* increased strength

The weblock weighs a total 136 grams, has a WLL of 4 kN and a MBS of 13 kN. This ultralight weblock is prohibited for tricklining and highlining, it's dedicated for rodeo lines only. It's available in our shop now: https://raed-slacklines.com/rodeo-weblock

Posted in news By Stephan Chudowski
We did some tests and found an interesting result when we tested a sewn loop on a soft shackle. * Used webbing: raed Helium (MBS 24 kN), 6mm Soft Shackle (MBS 42 kN) * the webbing broke at 14,9 kN - nearly 10 kN below the original MBS Our conclusions: * smaller diameter vs bigger diameter significantly reduces the MBS even in "static" situations * There are things about soft connections that we don't know about in total yet. * We wouldn't recommend the use of soft connections for highline rigs in this form. * We will put much more research into this in the future. Stay safe and keep the balance
Posted in news By Stephan Chudowski
Whoopies on Trees as Slackline Anchors? Well, you might want to read this... Today I had an interesting experience: I've been to Berlin's Tiergarten to take some photos of our new 5:1 pulley system and of course to session a bit on the Rainbow line too. Tiergarten is one of the most central and propably most policed parks in Berlin. Chancellor Angela Merkel's office is less than 500m away, you can see her balcony from the place where I rigged my line. The castle of Germany's president is in about 600m distance. So you might be right, if you assume a very high police presence and a strong presence of park rangers taking care of the order in that park. I've rigged my 40m longline many times in the park and sometimes the rangers came along and talked to me about it. The same happened today: It took about 20 minutes until they appeared in their park ranger car and checked, what I was doing there. He got out of the car, introduced himself and talked to me: "Well, here we have a slackline, right? Let's see if you have good tree protection, otherwise we have to ask you to leave!" He went over to my anchor and checked the 6mm dyneema whoopie and the TreePRO I used. "Hmm, that's interesting. Usually we have guys with some thin towels, we regularly have to make them derig their lines. But this... This is really good." He asked a colleague to come over and check it. They looked at it and I handed them one of the TreePROs I had in my backpack. "You have some stiff reinforcement in this?" he asked. "Yes, we made them especially for the use with these thin ropes, to spread the load to a wider area" - "Well, that's the best protection of a tree I've ever seen in a slackline. If you ever have any trouble in this park by one of my colleagues, just tell them my name (he repeated his name to me) and that I checked this. I see no reason to make you derig. This is really sophisticated." - Yes, he really said this. What I learned afterwards: He's the second chief of the park rangers for this area in Berlin. And he likes whoopies on trees with the raed TreePRO. If you told me that story yesterday, I would have laughed. But this really happened to me today. Happy slackline face for me now :) whoopie as a slackline anchor on a tree with tree protection
Posted in news By Stephan Chudowski
We know a little bit about Dyneema. And during the last 24 hours we received many questions about soft shackles for the connection of webbing pieces in long highlines. Here are some of our concerns, that we want to share with the community: 1.: We have no secure locking mechanism in soft shackles. Race sailors use soft shackles a lot. We come from a harbor city with many sailors, so we asked some: The answer is unanimously: Every then and when a soft shackle simply opens up in difficult situations and the sail gets blown loose. This happens to them, they know it and they have no serious harm from that. But we definitely would have severe damage if a soft shackle fails in a highline rig! 2.: A 1000m highline of 50m pieces needs at least 40 soft shackles from the method shown in Ryan's video. It's like the lottery: If you have one ticket, you have one chance to win. If you have 2, your chances double. So if you have 40 soft shackles in your rig, your chances of a "lottery win" increase by a lot. 3.: Taping. We tried it and are not really convinced. Taping on rope is not really a method that might last throughout multiple days with all weathers. I mean, we all have to reset and retape some paddings every then and when due to movement and weather. So we can't really recommend that, to securely lock soft shackles. 4. Additional splices/knots in the shackle. We know about that but we're not completely convinced about that either - yet. Maybe some further testing is needed here, but our first tries were not as promising as we hoped :/ We hope this helps to answer some of you guys' and girls' questions about that topic. We put lots of energy in the development of new Dyneema techniques and lots of research in the progress of our community regarding rigging techniques with Dyneema. But at this moment we honestly believe there is a lot more research needed on this issue before any of this should be sold by slackline companies or recommended in highline technique videos. Stay safe and keep the balance :)
Posted in news By Stephan Chudowski
Just in case you can't decide between the raed webbings in our shop: We created a little slackline webbing comparison chart. We hope this helps you :)

Helium

€0,69/ meter
  • Rodeolines
  • Polyester
  • Flat Webbing
  • Flat Edges
  • 4% stretch @10kN
  • 24 kN MBS
  • 38 g/m

Parsec

€0,99/ meter
  • Longlines
  • Polyester
  • Flat Webbing
  • Flat Edges
  • 4% stretch @10kN
  • 35 kN MBS
  • 59 g/m

MOTM

€1,49/ meter
  • Highlines
  • Nylon
  • Tubular
  • Soft Edges
  • 17% stretch @10kN
  • 27 kN MBS
  • 56 g/m

SuperMOTM

€3,29/ meter
  • Highlines
  • Nylon
  • Threaded
  • Soft Edges
  • 17% stretch @10kN
  • 34 kN MBS
  • 77 g/m
Posted in news By Stephan Chudowski
Posted in news slackpics By Stephan Chudowski
Destruction pr0n ftw: In preparation for the International Slackline Association - ISA safety certification of weblocks we performed some internal tests of our weblocks. And we want to share the results with you. On a highline your life might depend on our gear. That's why we believe it's important for you to know that you can trust Raed Slacklines gear under all the weirdest circumstances and under heaviest conditions. In this test we performed a single wrap with Parsec webbing on both weblocks. The recent 2017 version and the discontinued 2016 version. As you can see, the webbing slips once in the 2016 version at 25 kN. At 30 kN the webbing breaks in the 2016 model. In the recent 2017 model no slipping occures and a breaking strength of more than 30 kN is maintained. Stay safe and keep the balance!
Posted in news By Stephan Chudowski

Anytime when you want to walk across a slackline, you have to tension it first. The only eception from this is a rodeo line - which is completely untensioned and therefore much harder to learn and control because it moves completely free under the feet of the slackliner.

Tensioning a slackline can be an easy task for very short lines - and it can need quite the effort for longer lines. If you don't tension your longline enough, you might end up standing on the ground in the middle of the line, without being able to cross it completely (sending it).

The most efficient slackline pulley system in the world.

We are very bold in our advertising. From the beginning we proudly claimed to have engineered the most efficient slackline-pulleysystem out there. As you can see, Martha is able to tension her high tension Nylon Longline one handed with the PRO Pulley system.

While classic 5:1 slackline pulleysystems achieve an average efficiency of about 50%-65% (A.Schulz et al., 2013, https://vimeo.com/74945094), our goal was set a lot higher: We wanted a 9:1 pulley system, so it contains more ball bearings, that might create more (!) friction, but we wanted it to be much more efficient at the same time - in other words: we wanted double the bearings but less friction in total. So we had to absolutely minimize the friction. This is where the engineering process started and - long story short - we found a way to achieve this.

Last month one of our potential customers sent us the question, how efficient it really is and how it compares to the competitors in the market. So we used the first sunny days of spring to head out to the park and measure some values to start the calculations on the efficiency of our PRO pulleysystem.

We measured the force that is needed to pull the rope out of the pulley system to tension a longline to a certain load in the line. Then we put these values into a ratio, comparing it to the theoretical mechanical advantage that would be achieved without any friction in the system. The ratio of the real value to the theoretical value is called the "efficiency" of the whole pulley system.

In addition to the averaged values of the 2013 OID study from Alexander Schulz, we also added the measured values from Samuel Volery et al., who published values about the efficiency of his Hangover Pulley System in 2017 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rEdHMDOHbOw), to compare them with the field. As the HPS produces quite different values with different webbings, we calculated the average value of all the measured 9:1 values to compare them with the averaged values of the rope pulley systems.

As expected, the numbers show that the HPS is the least efficient way to tension long slacklines compared to efficient rope pulley systms. It takes you nearly 50% more power to tension with a HPS compared to the raed PRO pulley system.

 

Posted in news By Stephan Chudowski
Everybody knows their slackliner buddies: They usually own all the gear they're burning for. So you mostly don't know what might be the right present for their birthday or christmas. We know a solution: Have a close look at our slackline gifts category in our slackline online shop. We're sure you'll find sweet gifts for your slackline friends in there which they don't own yet but they'd really love one of them :)
Posted in news By Stephan Chudowski
You want to softpoint your slackline but you don't own a LineGrip® or any other device for it? This might be a good alternative for your rigging process:
Posted in news By Stephan Chudowski
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